Tag: Płock

The Lindeman family

The Lindeman family

In 1816, in Kutno Mordka Lindeman (Linderman) (born ca. 1791), son of the trader Berek and Bluma (daughter of Chaim), married Perel Fux (born ca. 1792), the daughter of the baker Szyja and Małka (daughter of Jonasz). In 1817 their son Chaim was born, and […]

The Berliner family

The Berliner family

One of the families associated with the former Szeroka Street (currently Józefa Kwiatka St.) was the Berliner family. Beniamin Berliner was born in 1829 in Płock as the son of Hersz and Maria. He was a tailor by profession (like his parents). In 1851 he […]

Józef Kwiatek and his street – exhibition by the Nobiscum Foundation in Płock’s City Hall

Józef Kwiatek and his street – exhibition by the Nobiscum Foundation in Płock’s City Hall

On September 19, a board exhibition entitled Józef Kwiatek and his street which the Nobiscum Foundation has realized in connection with the 145th anniversary of birth of Józef Kwiatek (1874-1910), will be opened at the P Gallery in the Płock City Hall.

The exhibition was prepared based on source materials available in the State Archives in Płock, the Central Archives of Historical Records in Warsaw, the Central Archives of Modern Records in Warsaw, the Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute as well as the Płock Scientific Society and the archives of the Provincial Office for the Protection of Monuments in Płock.

The exhibition tells the history of the most important Jewish street of pre-war Płock: facts related to everyday life and outstanding Płock citizens are intertwined with memories of residents and family souvenirs.

An important part of the exhibition are photographs of Tomasz Jacek Gałązka from Płock (one of them above) presenting Kwiatka Street, which were made available to the Foundation courtesy of the director of the State Archives in Płock Tomasz Piekarski.

We implement the project thanks to the funding received from the City of Płock.

The exhibition will be open until November 6, 2019.

 

Poster for the exhibition "Józef Kwiatek and his street", JewishPlock.eu
Poster for the exhibition “Józef Kwiatek and his street”
Remembrance. Płock 1939

Remembrance. Płock 1939

World War II brought the extermination of the Jews of Płock. In February and March 1941, the Nazi occupants deported about 10,000 Jews from Płock and nearby towns to German concentration camps. From around 9,000 of Jewish people living in Płock before the outbreak of […]

11 Grodzka Street

11 Grodzka Street

In 1841, property with the mortgage number 37 at Grodzka Street was purchased from Anna Kłobuszewska nee Zawidzka and Teofila Białkowska née Kłobuszewska by Samuel Majeran. In the years 1841-1842 Majeran erected a brick tenement house on the square. Since 1873, the owner of the […]

The Wajcman family

The Wajcman family

My grandfather, Izydor Wajcman (born 1867), came from a large Jewish family associated with Wyszogród. He was the son of Szmul Jochim (1841-1892), son of Zelik Lewek (born 1794) and Ryfka née Eben (born 1796), and Estera Sura née Albert (1837-1901), daughter of Mosiek Albert (born 1805) and Dwojra née Grosman (born 1808). Mosiek Albert was a grinder by profession. Szmul Jochim Wajcman was the owner of the property located at Rembowska Street (mortgage number 150). He lived there with his wife and children: Lewek Moszek, Ryfka (born 1869), Fajga (born 1870), Zelik (born 1873) and aforementioned Izydor.

My grandfather’s sister Ryfka Wajcman married a merchant named Moszek Aron Sadzawka (1864-1936) from Płock. They had seven children: sons Samuel (born 1896), Szaja (born 1901), Kazriel (1903-1910) and daughters Bajla (born 1897), Dyna (born 1898), Małka (1899-1918) and Gitla (born 1907). Ryfka Wajcman died in Treblinka, just like her son Samuel and his wife Złata and daughter Fajga Rachela.

Fajga Wajcman in 1897 married Moses Henszel. In 1904, they emigrated to the United States. They settled in the New York Bronx.

My grandfather’s brother – Zelik Wajcman married Fruma Wajcman, whom he met among students at the Imperial University of Warsaw. Zelik already had connections with the Zionist movement. Fruma, who came from Belarus, studied dentistry in Warsaw. Zelik and Fruma married in 1906 and soon after they left for Palestine.

In the 1890s, Izydor Wajcman moved to Warsaw. On July 21, 1896, he married Chawa (Ewa) Żurkowska from Płock (born 1873).

My grandmother Chawa was the daughter of Cerka Wyszogród (born 1849) and Jakub Mordka Żurkowski (born 1846) from Zgierz, son of Josek and Liba née Libersztejn. She had two sisters – Liba Fajga (born 1873) and Tauba Iska (born 1876) and brother Moszek Kalman (born 1870). Chawa’s grandfather – Szaja Wyszogród (born 1824) came from Drobin. In 1844 he married Ejdla Czerkas from Warsaw, daughter of Pinkus and Ryfka. According to the information contained in the Płock Calendar for the leap year 1876, Szaja Wyszogród was a merchant of grain and wool. At the same time, he was the owner of a property located at 3 Bielska Street (the mortgage number 118) and a property at 55 Szeroka Street (the mortgage number 135).

My grandmother’s sister – Tauba Iska in 1905 married Jakub Puszet. They both emigrated to Canada after 1912.

In Warsaw, the children of Chawa and Izydor Wajcman were born: Samuel (1899-1963), Józef (1902-1942) and twins: my mother Estera and Marek (Mordechaj) (born 1907, my mother died in 2002, Marek in 1995).

Izydor Wajcman provided for his family working as a private clerk. The family lived at 30 Świętojerska Street (where the Chinese Embassy is currently located). They usually spent their holidays in Otwock, Świder, Krynica, Marienbad or Zakopane. My mother’s family home was connected to Jewish tradition as well as Polish culture and secular upbringing of children. My mother Estera was a member of the socialist-Zionist youth movement Hashomer Hatzair. She received her secondary school certificate in Warsaw’s high school. Together with her two brothers, Samuel and Marek, as well as most of her friends, she emigrated to Palestine in the 1930s. My parents were married there (my dad Natan Scheiner was born in 1908 in Lviv).

Józef Wajcman graduated from the Jewish Private Junior High School of the Ascola Society (he received his secondary school certificate on June 5, 1923), then he joined the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences of the University of Warsaw, which he completed on June 26, 1928. After attending court and lawyer’s apprenticeship with attorney Stanisław Wyszogród, he started working in his own office at 32 Senatorska Street, where he dealt with civil cases. Józef married Lusia (her maiden name remains unknown), with whom he had a daughter, Joasia (born 1937).

After the outbreak of the war, Izydor and Ewa Wajcman were displaced to 21 Franciszkańska Street. They lived with Mejer Puszet (the owner of a pharmacy). It was probably their last address.

My grandparents Izydor and Ewa, their son Józef together with his wife Lusia and their daughter Joasia perished in Treblinka.

Ewa Błyskowska, Bruksela

The Jews of Płock during the defense of the city against the Bolsheviks in 1920

The Jews of Płock during the defense of the city against the Bolsheviks in 1920

On August 18, 1920, the Bolshevik army attacked Płock. Until August 19, the city’s civilian population, including women and children, heroically defended themselves on the barricades along with the army, preventing soldiers of Bolshevik Russia from gaining the bridgehead and crossing the Vistula. In the […]

Hechaluc – Pioneer Jewish organization

Hechaluc – Pioneer Jewish organization

Hechaluc began its activity in Płock in 1923. Its founders were A. Kowalski, F. Fliderblum and M. Kenigsberg. Szymon Margulin, Mojżesz Zander and A. Lejbgot were also part of the board of the organization. The organization’s goal was to emigrate its members to Eretz Israel. […]

Jewish Social Democratic Labour Party Poale Zion

Jewish Social Democratic Labour Party Poale Zion

The branch of the Jewish Social Democratic Labour Party Poale Zion was founded in Płock in 1904. After the Russian Revolution in 1905, the activity of Poale Zion was banned by tsarist police, and the members of the organization went underground. It was only after World War I and the creation of the Polish state that this movement succeeded in establishing branches in almost every city and town, also in Płock.

Poale Zion actively participated in the elections, both to the city authorities of Płock and parliamentary. They conducted evening courses and organized labour unions that were responsible for strikes, as a result of which employers had to pay higher wages to employees. In 1925, members of the organization founded a dramatic theater and sports club called Stern. Members of the organization stood out in their fight against anti-Semitism in the pre-war years and as anti-Nazi fighters during the war.

Most of them were murdered along with the entire Jewish community during the Holocaust.

Bibliography: Plotzk. A History of an Ancient Jewish Community in Poland, ed. E. Eisenberg, Tel-Aviv 1967

Members of Poale Zion by the portrait of Dow Ber Borochow, before 1933 (photo from the collection of the Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw), JewishPlock.eu
Members of Poale Zion by the portrait of Dow Ber Borochow, before 1933 (photo from the collection of the Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw)
Alfred Jesion

Alfred Jesion

Alfred Jesion was born in Płock on January 4, 1919 as the son of the sculptor Hersz Lejzor (Herman) (1886-1933) and Chawa nee Szechtman. The Jesion family lived in a tenement house at 4 Nowy Rynek (New Market Square). Alfred Jesion was interested in sculpture […]