JewishPlock.eu

JewishPlock.eu

Historia społeczności żydowskiej Płocka i regionu

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The Brygart family

The Brygart family

Lejzor Brygart was born on March 13, 1893, he was the son of Szlama (1842-1911) and Iska nee Fibus (1855-1918). Szlama Brygart was a butcher by profession. Lejzor had a younger brother – Dawid (born in 1894). In 1913, Lejzor Brygart married Dwojra Ides Bomzon […]

Estera Golde-Stróżecka

Estera Golde-Stróżecka

Estera Golde-Stróżecka – freethinker, activist for women’s rights, journalist, political and cultural-educational activist, doctor, was born on August 1, 1872 in Płock, as the daughter of Beniamin and Liba Ruchla nee Goldsztejn. Her father was a well-known merchant, industrialist and philanthrope. After graduating from the […]

The Bomzon family

The Bomzon family

Mining of the records revealed that the Bomzon (Baumzon; Bomsohn) family resided in Płock from the beginning of the 19th century.

My great grandfather, Izrael Abram Bomzon (1861-1913), son of Dawid Szlama (1826-1904) and Ruchla Łaja nee Liberman (1830-?), who was a professional gingerbread baker, married Enta Szrajber (1854-Holocaust) in 1901. The Bomzon family lived at the former Szeroka Street at number 30. In 1902, Izrael Abram Bomzon and his wife bought a property located at Szeroka Street (mortgage number 64A) and were its owners until 1905. Izrael Abram and Enta had eight children: Chaim (1885-1896), Hersz Fajwel (1887-?), Bajla Sura (1887-Holocaust), Dwojra Ides (1889-Holocaust), Estera (1891-Holocaust), Chawa (Eva) (1892-1968 in London), Brucha (1897-1906), and Lejb (1893-Holocaust).

In 1907, Bajla Bomzon married Moszek Ejzenman and they had eight children, four of whom migrated to Buenos Aires before the outbreak of World War II and the Holocaust. Two of the sisters, Hinda Ruchla (1917-2002; in 1949 she changed her name to “Dasza”) and Estera Malka (1910-2005; in 1953 she changed her name to “Elżbieta Maria”) survived the war in Russia and after the war returned to Płock, where they lived until they died.

Dwojra Ides Bomzon married Lajzer Brygart in 1913, and they had four children, Ruchla (Rushka; 1916-Holocaust), Iska (Irka; 1919-Holocaust), Szmyl Szlojma (Sam; 1920-2015 in USA), and Chanka (1927-Holocaust). In 1919, Lejzor and Dwojra Ides bought a property at 20 Kwiatka Street in Płock and were its owners until the outbreak of war. They also had a well-known colonial goods store in Płock, and manufactured candy and gingerbread. Their company was located at 28 Kwiatka Street. Sam Brygart was the sole survivor of his family and he migrated with his wife, Frymeta Menche (1922-2016), to the USA, where they had two daughters, Sandra and Leslie.

Estera Bomzon married Josef Hersz Cynamon in 1913, and they had four children, Izrael Abram (1914-2003 in Israel), Chana (1917-Holocaust), Lajzer (1922-Holocaust), and Ruchel (1926-Holocaust). Izrael was the sole survivor of his family and came to Israel (Palestine) as a soldier in General Anders’ army.

Chawa left Plock in 1910 to live in London, England, where she married Zvi Wagner with whom she had three children. After Zvi’s death, she married David Golding in 1923, with whom she had five children.

My grandfather, Lejb Bomzon, who was a confectioner, married Tauba Żeleźniak (daughter of Chaim Josef and Chana nee Motyl) in 1917. They had three children: Izrael Abram (Julius; 1918-1996 in Israel), Icek Jakub (Kuba; 1922-Holocaust) and Chana (1926-Holocaust). My grandparents and three children lived in one of the apartments at 33 Bielska Street, a property owned by Hersz Józef Bochenek and Fajga Pencherek. My father, Julius, was the sole survivor of his family. He hardly ever spoke of his childhood and lost family and never returned to Płock during his lifetime. He migrated with his wife, Bella Kociołek (born 1924) and only son, Lionel (Arieh; born 1947) to Sydney, Australia in 1947. In 1990, he and his wife moved to Israel to become the patriarch of the Bomzon family. Arieh married Therle (Tova) Hoffmann (born 1947) in 1972 in Johannesburg, South Africa, where they had three sons, Wayne (Ze’ev; born 1975), Keith (Ilan; born 1975), and David (born 1977). In 1981, Arieh and his family migrated to Israel.

Arieh (Lionel) Bomzon

Stanisław Posner

Stanisław Posner

Stanisław (Salomon) Posner was born on November 21, 1868 as the son of Leon and Matylda née Bornstein. His father was one of the proponents of the assimilation, many of his articles were printed in Warsaw’s “Jutrzenka”. Stanisław Posner’s sister was Malwina Garfein-Garska – writer […]

Rudolf Oberfeld

Rudolf Oberfeld

Rudold (Chaim Rubin) Oberfeld was born on November 14, 1859, as the son of Jakow and Ruchla née Nejmark. His wife was Franciszka née Bernsztejn. Oberfeld was a graduate of the Governorate Junior High School in Płock and legal studies at the University of Warsaw. […]

7 Misjonarska Street

7 Misjonarska Street

In 1870, the successors of Ojzer Lewita bought from the Town Hall of Płock for 1000 rubles in silver a square bordering from the south with Misjonarska street, from the west with prison buildings, from the north and east with the garden and property of Jakub Strzeszewski, henceforth called “the square of merchant Ojzer Lewita”, for the construction of a Jewish hospital. The hospital construction committee included 31 people, among them Icek Fogel, Ludwik Flatau, Dawid Woldenberg, Józef Askanas, Markus Pantofel and Fiszel Czapka.

Head and supervisor of the Izaak Fogel Jewish Hospital, launched in 1872, became Dr. Zygmunt Perkahl. According to data from 1891, the hospital housed 25 beds for internal and surgical patients, there was also a ward for mentally ill people. Until February 1915, the hospital remained under the management of the Public Benefit Governorate Council. From February 15 to September 9, 1915, the Citizens’ Committee was responsible for its maintenance, then it remained under the management of the Town Office of Płock. In January 1916, the patients were transferred to the Holy Trinity hospital, and in the empty building a hospital for infectious patients was arranged, maintained at the expense of the town and from fees for treatments.

On June 16, 1924, the hospital was returned to the Jewish community. In the interwar period the director of the hospital was the doctor of internal medicine, Izaak Feinberg, the head surgeon was Władysław Frankowski. The otolaryngologist Matjas Marienstras, surgeons Chaskiel aka Jerzy Bresler and Weinberg Peretz as well as internal medicine doctors – Hersz Kadysz, Witold Kirszensztejn and Jakub Winogron were also professionally associated with the hospital.

Bibliography:

Nowak G., Wojciechowska A., Żydowski Płock – architektoniczne wizje i realizacje, Płock 2014

Important information for donators: change of BIC/SWIFT code

Important information for donators: change of BIC/SWIFT code

We would like to inform all of our Donators, that since November 9, 2019 the BIC/SWIFT code of the BNP Paribas bank necessary for international transfers of donations to the Nobiscum Foundation’s account has changed. The code RCBWPLPW has been replaced by: PPABPLPK. Our bank […]

Maurycy Fajans

Maurycy Fajans

Maurycy Fajans (1827-1897) – a merchant and industrialist, was the son of Herman, a merchant from Sieradz, and Leontyna nee Kon. His brother was a well-known Warsaw photographer and owner of a lithographic and photographic studio Maksymilian Fajans (1825-1890). Maurycy Fajans was a representative of a […]

The guidebook “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” is available now!

The guidebook “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” is available now!

The mikvah, which existed even before the construction of the beautiful building, which is now the seat of the Art Gallery of Płock. The tenement house in which the Society for the Care of Jewish Children and the Shelter for Homeless Jewish Children was located. The real rabbi’s house – unlike the popular building on Kwiatka Street, it was really home to a distinguished Płock rabbi…

The latest publication of the Nobiscum Foundationthe guidebook entitled “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” – on 80 pages contains 37 locations in Płock related to the history of the Jewish community, including places and facts that were brought to light by Gabriela Nowak-Dąbrowska, the foundation’s vice president, during her research. Among them are places of religious importance, fulfilling crucial social or simply residential functions.

Before World War II, about 9,000 Jews lived in Płock. Jews had their homes, stores, workshops and enterprises here. They lived within the Jewish district, including Szeroka Street (today’s Kwiatka Street), Więzienna (Sienkiewicza), Ostatnia, Jerozolimska, Synagogalna, Bielska, Tylna and Niecała streets, but also on the most representative streets of the city – Tumska, Grodzka and the Old Market Square. The book is not only a guide to places – it tells the stories of people, the former Płock Jewish community – artists, social activists, medics, craftsmen, entrepreneurs…

The guidebook is the culmination of a project implemented by the Nobiscum Foundation thanks to funding received from the City of Płock, which aims to expand knowledge about the centuries-old presence of Jews in Płock and their role in the social, cultural and economic development of our city among Płock residents as well as visiting guest.

The guidebook was published in an edition of 500 and is available free of charge at the seat of the Płock Local Tourist Organization at 8 Old Market Square and the Art Gallery of Płock at 36 Sienkiewicza Street, starting from Friday 25 October 2019, during the opening hours of both institutions.

All current information about the guidebook is available at:

fundacjanobiscum.eu

jewishplock.eu

Contact regarding the guidebook, including shipping by post: info@fundacjanobiscum.eu

 

Stefan Themerson

Stefan Themerson

Stefan Themerson was born on January 25, 1910 as the son of Chaim Mendel aka Mieczysław Themerson (1871-1930) – a medical doctor, writer and publicist, and Sara Liba aka Salomea nee Smulewicz. In 1928 he graduated from the Władysław Jagiełło State Junior High School in […]