Tag: Jewish Plock

Maksymilian Eljowicz

Maksymilian Eljowicz

Maksymilian Eljowicz (1890-1942) – painter, born in Raciąż as the son of the craftsman Chaim Pinkas. At the beginning of the 20th century, his family moved to Płock. Here Maximilian started studying, then working in a watchmaker’s workshop. Since an early age he showed outstanding […]

Roman Pakuła

Roman Pakuła

Dr Roman (Rywen) Pakuła was the son of Mojżesz Aron and Enta, his family lived at 4 Grodzka Street in Płock. Below we publish two texts devoted to this extraordinary citizen of Płock and a valued scientist. Doctor Roman Pakuła – a biographical sketch prepared […]

Jakub Zysman

Jakub Zysman

Jakub Zysman (1861-1926) – a doctor and social worker, called “doctor Judym from Klimontów” (a reference to the character from the novel “Homeless People” by Stefan Żeromski), was born in Zakroczym as the son of Hersz Ber Zysman and Łaja nee Przysucher. In the 1870s, his family moved to Płock. Jakub had nine siblings: brothers Chaim (born in 1862), Majer (born in 1865), Szmul (born in 1866), Lewin (born in 1873) and Abram (born in 1877) and sisters Idel (born in 1868), Etta (born in 1873), Maria (born in 1875) and Rozalia (born in 1877). He lost his mother early and his father remarried to Chawa Przysucher. The Zysman family lived at Królewiecka Street in the property of Władysław and Zofia Lubowidzki. Ambitious and talented Jakub attended the governorate gymnasium in Płock. In 1887 he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the Imperial University of Warsaw. Two years later he changed his religion to Evangelical-Augsburg. He practiced in Wisznice, then in Warsaw, from 1891 in Klimontów. In 1894 he married Eufemia Maria née Modzelewski, with whom he had three children: Jerzy, Irena and Wiktor (also known as Bruno Jasieński). By the people of Klimontów, Jakub Zysman was not only remembered as a generous doctor (he treated poor residents of the town and the surrounding area for free), but also a great social activist: initiator of the creation of the Klimontów Loan and Savings Society, activist of the Orphan Shelter Society and co-organizer of the Polish Educational Society. Thanks to Jakub Zysman, a fire station was built in Klimontów, paving of streets and squares began, a telegraph connection between Klimontów and Opatów was carried out. During World War I, Jakub Zysman and his family stayed in Moscow, where he served as a military doctor. After the war, he returned to Klimontów, where he lived and worked until his death in 1926. A great citizen of Klimontów, the religion of whom was to take care of every person who needed help, was accompanied in his final journey by nearly 10,000 people.

Bibliography:

Jaworski K., Dandys. Słowo o Brunonie Jasieńskim, Warszawa 2009

Zarębski M., Jakub Zysman – lekarz społecznik, animator licznych inicjatyw obywatelskich w Klimontowie,

http://www.oil.org.pl/jsp/bip/drukuj.jsp?classId=/oil/oil56/gazeta/numery/n2011/n201110/n20111010

[accessed on: 14.05.2020]

Guterman and Alterowicz family

Guterman and Alterowicz family

Symcha Guterman (Symcha’s biogram can be found here – link) was born on September 1, 1903 in Warsaw, as the son of the talmudist Menachem Mendel (born ca. 1870) and Bajla Gitla née Fiszman (born ca. 1872). His mother came from a wealthy family from […]

Zofia Pakuła

Zofia Pakuła

Zofia Pakuła née Graubart was the daughter of Abram Nusen aka Natan (born in 1886) and Chaja (born in 1891). She had an older sister Jadwiga (born in 1918). The Graubard family lived at 8 Sienkiewicza St. Natan Graubard was a grain merchant, owner of […]

Icek Nierób

Icek Nierób

Icek Nierób was born on January 1, 1925 in Płock, as the son of Abraham and Ryfka (Regina) née Pencherek. Abraham and Ryfka were also the parents of Bela (born 1918), Miriam (born 1920), Leon (born 1922), Terca (twin sister of Icek, who died in 1926), Roma (born 1927), Mejer (Marek) (born 1929) and Ida (born 1929). Icek was named after his uncle who died during the Russian-Japanese war. The Nierób family lived at Kwiatka Street (formerly Szeroka Street) at number 26. Abraham Nierób supported his family by working as a tailor. Icek attended a public school for Jewish children. He loved sport, especially football. In 1937, his mother died, and the following year Abraham married Estera née Luszyńska, who came from Gąbin.

After the outbreak of World War II, Icek’s family escaped to his stepmother’s hometown. After a month they returned to Płock. On March 1, 1941, they were deported to Działdowo, then to Bodzentyn. In the summer of 1941 Icek was transported to the forced labor camp in Skarżysko-Kamienna. After the camp liquidation in the summer of 1944, Icek was sent to the labor camp in Sulejów. At the end of December 1944 he was transferred to Częstochowa. On January 17, 1945, together with a group of prisoners, he was sent to the Buchenwald concentration camp. After the liberation of the camp, Icek went to Weimar, then to Frankfurt. His whole family died in Treblinka.

In the spring of 1949, Icek Nierób emigrated to the United States. In the early 1950s he settled in Los Angeles. Here he met Henrietta (Kate) Hirshfield, whom he married in 1954. Kate was a widow and had a daughter Doris, born in 1950, whom Icek adopted. In 1956 their daughter Renee was born, and a year later their son Alan. In 1959, Icek (then Jack) opened his own company, Jack Nierob Plumbing. He was the author of memories that were published under the title “A Lucky Man”.

Icek Nierób died on March 8, 2020.

The 77th anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Boruch Szpigel and Izaak Bernsztejn.

The 77th anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Boruch Szpigel and Izaak Bernsztejn.

April 19, 2020 marks the 77th anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. In connection with the anniversary, we present two people from the Płock region, whose activities were related to the Warsaw ghetto. Bronek (Boruch) Szpigel from Wyszogród (1919–2013, pictured on the […]

Dawid (Devi) Tuszyński

Dawid (Devi) Tuszyński

Dawid (Devi) Tuszyński – a painter and master of miniatures, was born in Brzeziny on September 17, 1914 (according to the entries in the registry books for the town of Brzeziny), as a son of Icek Tuszyński (born in 1879) and Sura nee Bajbok (born […]

1 Kwiatka Street

1 Kwiatka Street

Under the contract concluded on June 1, 1824 with the Municipal Office of the Town of Płock, the merchant Jakub Lewin Szenwic (born in 1789) received a perpetual lease of the square located at Nowa Street at that time (property 258 E) for an annual rent of 10 PLN. On this square, before 1827, he erected a brick house with one floor and a basement, covered with Dutch tiles. After his death, the property was inherited by his son Chaskiel Szenwic (1817-1889). By virtue of an official will of October 18/30, 1864, and following a request of September 20 / October 2, 1867 and 7/19 January 1870, he was registered as its owner. Before 1871, Chaskiel Szenwic erected a new brick front house: partly half-timbered, tiled, with two stories and a residential attic.

Since 1880, at the Chaskiel Szenwic house operated the Optician and Jewelery Company of Moritz Szenwic, who advertised it in the pages of “Korespondent Płocki”:

I hereby inform the Dear Audience that since January 1 this year. I have set up a repair workshop for watches, where I perform all repairs very quickly, at very affordable prices, and I have various new wall clocks to sell. I perform optical and all jewelery works 25% cheaper than larger jewelry workshops in Płock…

The next owner of the property was Tauba Itta Szenwic née Borensztejn, who purchased it from Chaskiel Szenwic for the amount of 12,000 rubles and by virtue of the act of September 29 / October 11, 1882 and the application of April 29, 1891 was registered as its owner. Tauba Itta, daughter of Hersz and Sura née Zdugman, was the daughter-in-law of Chaskiel Szenwic, wife of his son Manchajm (born in 1845) – a trader, owner of coal and wood store. At the beginning of 1893, Manchajm Szenwic opened a cooling drink manufacture at Szeroka Street.

In 1907, Manchajm and Tauba Itta Szenwic née Borensztejn bought a neighboring property at Tumska Street, mortgage number 258, for the sum of 598 rubles and 75 kopecks.

In 1909, at 1 Szeroka Street, the Russian authorities legalized the Bieker Chajlim Jewish Funeral Association, the founders of which were Jakub Szenwic, Izydor Wasserman, Chaskiel Perelgryc, Abram Fiszman, Manchajm Szenwic, Mordka Dancygier and Kalman Frenkiel.

After the death of Tauba Itta Szenwic, half of the property was acquired by Manchajm Szenwic, by virtue of pre-marriage intercourse of July 29, 1873, and the other half, in equal parts, became the property of Pessa Pelagia née Szenwice Rajcher (b. 1876), Ryfka Regina née Szenwice Wolman (b. 1886), Sura Stefania Szenwic (born in 1896), Hersz Herman Szenwic (born in 1877), Lejzor Eleazar vel Ludwik Louis Szenwic (born in 1888), Icek Izaak Jerzy Szenwic (born in 1879) and Chaja Fajga Helena Szenwic (born in 1881). The above-mentioned were registered as its owners pursuant to the protocol of closing the inheritance proceedings of October 8, 1920 and the application of May 27, 1921.

The property of the Szenwic family, including the property at Tumska St., was later purchased by Jan Trojanowski for the amount of 7,000,000 marks and, pursuant to the act of 16 August and the application of 17 August 1921, he was registered as its owner.

The list of sign boards prepared for 1929 lists 10 companies at 1 Szeroka Street: “Bar Europejski”, haberdashery shop of Stanisław Ciesielski, seed shop of Natan Graubard, the Schicht company, haberdashery shop of B. Rozental, clothes shop of L. Lichtman, engraving factory of L. Ejchelt, “Czesława” haberdashery company, haberdashery shop of J. Zelkowicz and smoked meat store of Jan Trojanowski, the property owner. According to data from 1937, this address included Jakub Purzycki’s hairdresser business, Konstanty Kowalewski’s restaurant and Chaskiel Kohn’s bookbinding workshop.

According to data from 1931, 76 people lived at 1 Szeroka Street. In the outbuilding, in which there were 6 apartments, the following people lived together with their families: Zofia Dybicz, Ludwika Dydecka, Jan Trojanowski, Hugon Gross, Blima Gruszka, Juda Głowiński, Moszek Magnes and Adam Kowalski; in the front house with 10 apartments: Sender Chmiel, Konstanty Kowalewski, Izrael Klinger, Pessa Krasiewicz, Henryk Siedliński, Luzer Lichtman, Chaim Kon, Lejzer Kugel, Pinkus Neuman, Paulin Więcławski and Izrael Finkelsztejn.

At the end of August 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II, 25 families lived at this address, including the family of Izrael Klinger, Juda Tyber, Luzer Lichtman, Chilel Kon, Luzer Kugel, Lejb Gruszka, Abram Cymbler, Izrael Kwiat, Szmul Kiper and Chaskiel Kon.

The property at 1 Kwiatka Street still belongs to the descendants of Jan Trojanowski.

Kazimierz Mayzner

Kazimierz Mayzner

Kazimierz Mayzner was born on July 6, 1883 in Warsaw, as the son of Izydor and Anna née Woldenberg. His father was considered a humanist and a patriot, he was an outstanding industrialist, co-owner of a trade company, co-founder of the Mayzner Society of Sugar […]


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