Tag: Jews in Plock

7 Misjonarska Street

7 Misjonarska Street

In 1870, the successors of Ojzer Lewita bought from the Town Hall of Płock for 1000 rubles in silver a square bordering from the south with Misjonarska street, from the west with prison buildings, from the north and east with the garden and property of […]

Maurycy Fajans

Maurycy Fajans

Maurycy Fajans (1827-1897) – a merchant and industrialist, was the son of Herman, a merchant from Sieradz, and Leontyna nee Kon. His brother was a well-known Warsaw photographer and owner of a lithographic and photographic studio Maksymilian Fajans (1825-1890). Maurycy Fajans was a representative of a […]

The guidebook “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” is available now!

The guidebook “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” is available now!

The mikvah, which existed even before the construction of the beautiful building, which is now the seat of the Art Gallery of Płock. The tenement house in which the Society for the Care of Jewish Children and the Shelter for Homeless Jewish Children was located. The real rabbi’s house – unlike the popular building on Kwiatka Street, it was really home to a distinguished Płock rabbi…

The latest publication of the Nobiscum Foundationthe guidebook entitled “In the footsteps of Płock Jews” – on 80 pages contains 37 locations in Płock related to the history of the Jewish community, including places and facts that were brought to light by Gabriela Nowak-Dąbrowska, the foundation’s vice president, during her research. Among them are places of religious importance, fulfilling crucial social or simply residential functions.

Before World War II, about 9,000 Jews lived in Płock. Jews had their homes, stores, workshops and enterprises here. They lived within the Jewish district, including Szeroka Street (today’s Kwiatka Street), Więzienna (Sienkiewicza), Ostatnia, Jerozolimska, Synagogalna, Bielska, Tylna and Niecała streets, but also on the most representative streets of the city – Tumska, Grodzka and the Old Market Square. The book is not only a guide to places – it tells the stories of people, the former Płock Jewish community – artists, social activists, medics, craftsmen, entrepreneurs…

The guidebook is the culmination of a project implemented by the Nobiscum Foundation thanks to funding received from the City of Płock, which aims to expand knowledge about the centuries-old presence of Jews in Płock and their role in the social, cultural and economic development of our city among Płock residents as well as visiting guest.

The guidebook was published in an edition of 500 and is available free of charge at the seat of the Płock Local Tourist Organization at 8 Old Market Square and the Art Gallery of Płock at 36 Sienkiewicza Street, starting from Friday 25 October 2019, during the opening hours of both institutions.

All current information about the guidebook is available at:

fundacjanobiscum.eu

jewishplock.eu

Contact regarding the guidebook, including shipping by post: info@fundacjanobiscum.eu

 

Stefan Themerson

Stefan Themerson

Stefan Themerson was born on January 25, 1910 as the son of Chaim Mendel aka Mieczysław Themerson (1871-1930) – a medical doctor, writer and publicist, and Sara Liba aka Salomea nee Smulewicz. In 1928 he graduated from the Władysław Jagiełło State Junior High School in […]

The sukkot of Płock

The sukkot of Płock

Sukkot (Festival of Tabernacles, Festival of Shelters) is a holiday commemorating the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt and wandering in the desert during which they experienced direct divine protection. At the time of this holiday, the sukkot (in Polish „kuczki”) are being built, in which people […]

The Jewish Count at the 3rd Jewish Culture Festival in Płońsk

The Jewish Count at the 3rd Jewish Culture Festival in Płońsk

The Nobiscum Foundation cordially invites you to the exhibition “The Jewish Count. The story of Stanisław Posner”, which this time we will have the pleasure to present in the exhibition hall of the Municipal Culture Centre in Płońsk to all the guests of the 3rd Jewish Culture Festival in the city of Ben Gurion (the full festival programme can be found here – Polish only: mckplonsk.pl).

Last year was the 150th anniversary of the birth of this prominent lawyer, sociologist, publicist, senator of the first and second term in the Second Polish Republic, born in Kuchary Żydowskie in the Płońsk region. On this occasion, an exhibition has been created and presented so far at the Department No. 7 of the Władysław Broniewski Płock Library, during the 5th January Uprising Run in Kuchary Żydowskie and in the Municipal Culture Centre in Sochocin.

Stanisław Posner went down in history not only as a lawyer, prominent politician and statesman, but also as a selfless social activist, an enthusiast of books and reading, a great citizen and a man of extraordinary heart. During World War I, while in exile in Paris, Posner worked with great enthusiasm for Polish independence: he wrote about Poland to numerous French magazines, gave lectures, held conferences, tried to act in the interest of Poland, organized Poles in France, prepared them for future activity in independent Poland. He was the initiator and creator of Adam Mickiewicz People’s University in Paris, co-organized the Polish Teaching League – an institution that set itself the task of collecting materials necessary for the reconstruction of the school system in the country.

The exhibition, the author of which is Gabriela Nowak-Dąbrowska, historian and vice president of the Nobiscum Foundation, is an is an attempt of presenting this important and interesting, though fairly unknown persona to a wider audience. It was prepared using materials obtained from the Central Archives of Modern Records in Warsaw, the National Digital Archives, the State Archives in Warsaw and, above all, the Manuscript Department of the University of Warsaw Library, which holds the rich legacy of Stanisław Posner.

The exhibition will be open since October 19 until October 31, 2019.

Invitation to the 3rd Jewish Culture Festival in the city of Ben Gurion, JewishPlock.eu
Invitation to the 3rd Jewish Culture Festival in the city of Ben Gurion

 

The Jewish Count. The story of Stanisław Posner. Poster of the exhibition by the Nobiscum Foundation, JewishPlock.eu
The Jewish Count. The story of Stanisław Posner. Poster of the exhibition by the Nobiscum Foundation
1 Kościuszki Street

1 Kościuszki Street

The property with the former mortgage number 281 is located in the eastern corner of Tumska and Kościuszki streets, in the space of the historic downtown of Płock. The first owner of the property was Ludwik Mahn, an assessor, the architect of the Płock department, […]

Józef Kwiatek

Józef Kwiatek

Józef Kwiatek was born on January 22, 1874 in Płock, in a large Jewish family. His father Fiszel, son of Efroim Kwiatek (1792-1875) and Sura née Kagan, traded in colonial goods. Józef’s mother was Hinda née Prussak. Józef had six siblings – brothers Symcha (born […]

The Lindeman family

The Lindeman family

In 1816, in Kutno Mordka Lindeman (Linderman) (born ca. 1791), son of the trader Berek and Bluma (daughter of Chaim), married Perel Fux (born ca. 1792), the daughter of the baker Szyja and Małka (daughter of Jonasz). In 1817 their son Chaim was born, and in 1820 – Moszek Józef. Mordka Lindeman was a professional trader. According to the Kutno Books of Residents, in April 1848 Moszek Józef Lindeman moved to Płock. He married Zelda Bajla née Łopatka, who was born in Płock in 1827, as the daughter of Gerszon and Fajga. Presumably, Moszek moved from Kutno to Płock to marry Zelda and they set up home there. According to The Book of Residents for Plock, the Lindeman family lived at 2 Synagogalna Street (mortgage number 40), close to the Great Synagogue. Moszek and Zelda had (at least) seven children: Mordka (born in 1857), Małka (born in 1860), Łaja (born in 1851), Berysz (born in 1866), Wolf (born in 1868), Chawa Pessa (born in 1874) and Icek.

Around 1881, Małka, Berysz, Wolf and Icek emigrated to London.

Harvey Kaplan, Glasgow, Scotland

The Berliner family

The Berliner family

One of the families associated with the former Szeroka Street (currently Józefa Kwiatka St.) was the Berliner family. Beniamin Berliner was born in 1829 in Płock as the son of Hersz and Maria. He was a tailor by profession (like his parents). In 1851 he […]